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There is a Trojon Worm Virus that asks you to install an adobe flash plug-in. So far there is no repair for this virus. It destroys the Zero Sector of the Hard Disc where vital information of your comouter is saved.

DO NOT respond to an email named Invitation FACEBOOK, even if it’s from one of your best friends. When you log onto it it opens an Olympic Tourch that burns the whole hard disc C of your compter.

This virus will be received from someone you probably had in your address book. So if invitation FACEBOOK pops up in your email delete immediately.


Be cautious responding to any phone call or emails from Area Code 809, 284, or 876. There have been many scams connected with these area codes.

Here’s how it works. You get an email or call from one of these area codes saying sorry I missed your call. Or they might tell you that some relative of yours is sick or in trouble. No matter what the call or email it is designed to get you to return a call connected to an “international” phone number the results of which you will be billed an exuberant rate and billed as such. (has been reported to be as much as $25 per minute)

Unfortunately there’s not much you can do because these are legal charges for the country that they are operating in. Most of them are in the Dominican Republic, Canada or a Caribbean country. They don’t have to comply with United states Laws regarding such calls. The bad thing about these calls is that you probably will not realize the costs of these calls until you get your telephone bill.

Never return calls to any unfamiliar number or person. You can call the directory assistance operator to get information on any suspicious call you may have recieved. They can check the area code location of the call.

Carefully read your telephone bill when you receive it. Check all charges and any fees that might be connected with any charges listed on your bill.

If you feel you have been scamed contact the carrier the charge was originated from. The name and phone number should be printed on your bill. Often the charge can be resolved by simple phone call. If the carrier refuses to resolve the charges then call your carrier or ATT&T. ATT&T will work with your carrier to try to cancel any fraudulent charge and help remove it from your bill.

ATT&T has been working hard to eliminate these scams for some time now. You may also file a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission and give them the information to look into your situation.


Living with an Alzheimer’s patient can be very challenging. Each person suffering from AD can react to the disease differently. Helping these patients takes a lot of patience and knowlege. You will have to develop skills and be creative in your approach of caring for them.

It is estimated that over 4.5 million American adults may have this impairment. You must learn to recognize the early symptoms and start preparing for being a care giver that could last for a long time.

AD is a progressive disease that affects the brain cells that produce Dementia, and memory loss. AD normally affects older people but it could start at a low age of 50. You cannot predict how fast the disease will progress because it varies with each patient. Some early signs can be having a hard time finding the right word to say, finishing thoughts, following directions, and loss of reasoning. If a person has a loss between night and day an gets dressed to go out thinking that the day is just starting is another good sign of early AD.

It is hard to predict what an AD person may do. Think prevention and try to adapt the person’s surroundings to decrease hazards. Here is some ideas you may want to consider:
* Display all emergency numbers, your home address, family and friends names, in several places in the home and by each phone.
* Leave a spare key with a neighbor in case the person locks you out.
* Try not to use extension cords. Place lights and appliances near an outlet. If you have to, secure it to the baseboard.
* Cover unused wall outlets with “child-proof” plugs.
* Stairways should have at least one handrail and it should extend beyond the first step. Carpeted
stairs or stairs with safety grips are best.
* Keep ALL medications and prescription drugs (over the counter drugs) under lock and key. Be sure all are clearly marked with the name, doseage, strength, and expiration date. It is also good to have the pharmacy name, local emergency services phone number in the locked cabinet.
* Keep all alcohol locked up as well. Alcohol increases confusion in AD patients.
* Keep sharp objects and clutter out of the way. Be sure all passageways are clear.
* Remove firearms and other weapons from the home, or render them safe by locking them up and
engage trigger safety locks. It’s best to keep the ammunition in another location again locked up.
* Power tools and machinery can be dangerous. Survey your worksop, basement or garage for
possible danger with these items.
* Be aware of all poisonous materials. Even some plants can be harmful. Check with your local poisoncontrol center if you have any questions about a certain plant or substance.
* Be sure all the important information stored on your computer is safe. Install passwords or save it
on a CD, or flash drive for safe keeping. There are several different programs you can install to help protect your stored files. Your local electronic store can help you recommend a program for your needs.
* Remove scatter rugs or any flooring that in not secured to the floor.

Alzheimer’s is a hard on the individual as well as family and friends. Trying to keep them safe and happy at home for as long is possible is a win-win situation for all concerned. Hopefully in the near future, a cure can be found for this terrible disease.


This time of the year identity theft is at it’s height. More people are filing their tax returns online. If you stop to think about it, your return has all the information needed to steal your identity. Therefore, it’s important to take steps to be sure this information is secure.

If your computer does not update your spyware daily, I recommend you install this feature before sending out your tax return on-line. It’s usually very simple and takes just a minute or two. My computer up-dates at 3am in the morning every day. You can set the time for your computer to up-date at any time you like. If you don’t have any protective spyware , you can download several different programs at a nominal fee. There are many free spyware programs available as well. Do some research, and decide which one best meets your needs. Talk to your friends or a computer center to see which one they recommend. I use AVG Spyware and have very pleased with it, and it’s free.

Windows Internet Explorer 7 browser also has a feature to keep your identity safer.

I talked about phishing in an earlier post. It’s when you are scammed into providing your personal data to an individual or company that are supposedly helping you. These emails usually tell you your account has been breached and they need this information to protect you. What they are actually doing is collecting your information to steal your identity. Before disclosing personal information, check out the company or website . Be sure they are legitimate as well as “a secure” website. If you feel you’ve sent your information to a fake, phishing, website report it immediately to the appropriate institutions. Such as: IRS , FTC , Federal Trade Commission and an organization called the Anti-Phishing Group. If you have used a credit card, call and cancel it. This will minimize any damage that might have been done.

You should also change your passwords on all your online accounts if you feel you’ve been compromised. Especially accounts related to any of your financial information.

A good program to download is Windows Defender. This program was originally called Windows Spyware and is a free Microsoft program. It reviews and protects against possible unwanted software.

The best defense against identity theft on the computer is educating yourself on ways people steal your identity and the programs available to protect yourself. It is important you up-date your security programs routinely.


Posted on March 20th, 2008 at 05:13 by Alex Smith in computer security,Email Security,Identity theft,security services - Comments (0)

Most people give the information a person needs to steal their identity without knowing it. Leaving documents around or throwing them in the trash is an example. Here are a few tips to safegaurd your idenity information.

* Buy a shredder. You can purchase one very inexpensively at any discount store. They simply fit over a trash can and will shred paper documents as well as the “old” credit card. First rule of thumb, shred all personal documents. Even those unsolicited credit applications your receive .

* Protect your social security and driver’s license numbers. Don’t give them out to someone you don’t know. Your driver’s license numer can be just as dangerous to give out as your social security number. This number tags you to your identity. That’s why all wotk and credit applications ask for it. If fact, it’s best not to carry your social security card with you. Remit it to memory. Don’t have these printed on your checks.

* Never give out personal information over the phone, internet or mail before you know who you are dealing with.

* Protect any of your passwords. Don’t use an obvious password like your birthday, street address, some numbers of your social security card or mother’s maiden name. If you have forgotten your password, be suspicious of any website you click on to have them email it back to you.

* Remember, even your residence may not be a safe place to keep personal documents. This especially true if you have a roomate, employ outside domestic help, do a lot of entertaining, or work done in your home.

* A lot of links on the internet are “trogan Horses.” Never click on any unsolicited email link. Use only a website address you know. Have a “firewall”, spyware or antivirus software added to your computer. I have all three on my computer. Some antivrus programs, such as AVG, are free and very good. Use a program that always up-dates your software. They can automatically do this daily even at a time you don’t use your computer.
*The government has a great site for additional information. If you need to file a complaint for some type of identity or would like more information, check this site.


As we are becoming a more “cash free” society, the crime of Identity Theft is increasing at an alarming rate. The criminals are also getting more sophisticated in their means to accquire your personal information. Identity Theft is a serious crime and can damage your credit without you knowing it. Getting your credit restored can be costly and it take s a long time to correct the damage done by Identity Theft.

The first line of defense is to know some of the many ways people steal your identity:
* If you see anyone going through a dumpster or someone’s trash, report it immediately. They may be looking for discarded bills, credit applications, or anything that might have any personal information on it.
*Do not give any information to someone calling you or emailing you trying to “up-date” your account informatiom. Banks and credit card companies do not do this. They already have your information.
*Be careful where you use your credit card. Some shady merchants may have a systen that duplicates your credit card infomation as you use your card. This is called “skimming.” This can occur on items you purchase over the internet as well. “Caveat empore”, let the buyer beware.
* Report immediately any bill that you were suppose to receive but it hasn’t arrive when you expected it. Criminals will take them out of your mail box to obtain your information. Don’t leave personal information in your desk or file cabinet at work.
* Another ploy is to put in a change of address form to another location to re-route your mail.
*They can steal your wallet or purse. Call your credit card companies and cancel your card. Also, report to the three major credit bureaus immediately. They can block anyone from changing or adding to your accounts. There is a toll free number for each bureau and when you report to them they are required by law to send you a “free” credit report.

The three main credit bureaus are:
Equifax 1-800-525-6285
Experian 1-888 397-3742
TransUnion 1-800-680-7289

You can obtain more information from the government by calling a toll free number 1-877-438-4338 or logonto their website.


Posted on February 27th, 2008 at 07:11 by Alex Smith in computer security,Email Security,Identity theft,security services - Comments (0)

There’s a story going around about placing hypodermic syringes needles infected with HIV on gas pumps, theater seats, and other places. These stories have been going around almost as long as the HIV virus was discovered.

When a supposedly reliable source sent me an Email about this, I forwarded the information to friends and family. I was really sucked into believing the story was true and was about to write a blog about it. My wife asked me if I had checked out this story to see if it was true or not. She pulled up on her computer several sites including the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Department refuting the story.

The story I was sent was about a warning of hidden syringes on gas pump handles. The story was first circulated in 2000 supposedly by a Captain Abraham Sands of the Jacksonville, Florida Police Department and it is making the rounds again. There’s no such Police Officer or a Jacksonville Police Department. Jacksonville, Florida Area is served by the Sheriff’s Department. So you can see how easy it is to be mislead by an email you receive even from someone you trust.

Before passing on information you receive by email, check out the original source. There are many hoax’s being spread through emails by well-intentioned people.


Posted on January 30th, 2008 at 05:37 by Alex Smith in Email Security - Comment (1)

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